Serbian Stamps 1941-1943

1: 1941 Reprinted Yugoslav stamps with overprint ‘Serbien’ (1)
2,3: Explosion in Ammunition Dump in Smederevo Fortress (1941)
4: Prisoners of War Fund (1941)
5-8: Anti-masonic Exhibition in Belgrade (2) (1942)
9: Prisoners of War Fund (1942)

1941 Reprinted Yugoslav stamps with overprint 'Serbien'

Serbian Post Centenary (1943):

Serbian Post Centenary (1943)

Serbian Post Centenary (1943)

Serbian Post Centenary (1943)

1: 1942 Airmail
2-10: 1942 Definitives: Monasteries
11: Orphans Fund (1942)
12-15: War Wounded Fund (1943)
16: 1943 Bombardment of City of Nis (overprint on 1942 definitives)
17: 1943 Official Stamp
18: 1941 Postage Due Stamps (overprint on unissued Yugoslav stamps)
19,20: 1942 Postage Dues
21: 1943 Postage Dues

Miniature Sheets no. 3 and 4: War Wounded Fund (1943):

Miniature Sheets no. 3 and 4: War Wounded Fund (1943)

Miniature Sheets no. 3 and 4: War Wounded Fund (1943)

(1) In April 1941, Yugoslavia was invaded and then disgracefully dismantled by Germany and it’s allies. Province of Kosovo and Western Macedonia were put under Albanian control, Montenegro became an Italian protectorate, Hungary took control over some parts of Vojvodina (Northern Serbian province), Bulgaria took the rest of Macedonia and Ustashi Croatia annexed some Western Serbian provinces. On April 30th, 1941, the Germans formed a provisional Serbian government under the leadership of M. Acimovic, a former Yugoslav Minister of the Interior. Near normality existed until the German conflict with the USSR. The subsequent actions of the partisans caused the Germans to worry that law and order would collapse in a critical strategic area. On August 29th, General Milan Nedic, a former Yugoslav Minister of War, was made President of a new Government of National Salvation. Nedic assisted the formation of Serbian State Guard and Serbian Volunteer Corps. The new government established harsh racial laws and immediately established concentration camps for Jews, Gypsies and others. As a result, in August 1942, Dr. H. Turner (the chief of the German civil administration in Serbia) announced that Serbia was the only country in which the “Jewish question” was solved and that Belgrade was the “first city of a New Europe to be Judenfrei.”

(2) A heavily anti-semitic “Grand Anti-Masonic Exhibition” opened in occupied Belgrade on 22nd October 1941 and ended on January 19, 1942. It was funded by the German occupiers and supported by Serbian president M. Nedic to intensify hatred against the Jews, although the title of the exhibit suggested the Masons. Nedic was a supporter of the German plan for extermination of the Jews.

The central theme was an alleged Jewish-Communist-Masonic plot for world domination. Besides the exhibits at the exhibition, an enormous amount of propaganda material was prepared: over 200 thousand various brochures, 60 thousand posters, 100 thousand flyers, 108 thousand of samples of 9 different types of envelopes, 176 propaganda movie clips, etc. Organizers advertised that “This concept of exhibition will be unique not only in Serbia and the Balkans, not only in southeastern Europe and Europe, but in the world.”

A few months later, on January 1, 1942, Serbian authorities issued postage stamps commemorating the opening of this popular exhibit. These stamps, which juxtaposed Jewish and Serbian symbols (but did not contain Nazi symbols), portrayed Judaism as the source of world evil. The surtax on this issue was used for Anti-Masonic, Anti-Communist, and Anti-Jewish propaganda.